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Tips For A Sustainable and Organic Thanksgiving

November 16th, 2017

Ah, Thanksgiving: The unofficial opening of the Holiday Stress Season. Whether you’re looking forward to the holiday or dreading it, stress can too often spoil the good times the occasion promises. Luckily, a little pre-Thanksgiving planning can make all the difference! Here are a few tips to make your Thanksgiving holiday a little more organic and a little less stressful!

#1: Go fresh and local. To start your Thanksgiving planning, draw up a simple harvest menu using what’s fresh in your local area in mid-November. Yes, there are some T-day staples that you won’t want to give up no matter where they came from. But choose as many fresh, local, organic ingredients as you can; they’ll taste great, and it’s a great reason to check out area farmer’s markets before they all close down for the season. As an added bonus, you’ll probably be able to source your ingredients for less than you could at a grocery store.

#2: Spread out the work. Start shopping and cooking now (and cleaning, too; funny how I almost forgot to mention my least-favorite part). Make your piecrusts now, put them in the pie pans, wrap tightly, and freeze them. Buy all the nonperishable foods you’ll need, and take it easy on yourself. Things like cranberry sauce, gravy, pie shells, and even complete pies, come pre-made—you can often find organic versions, too. Just stick with pre-made foods in glass jars, since cans are lined with bisphenol A. Also, dig out any necessary supplies, including extra plates and cutlery. Not enough plates? Don’t buy paper. A few days prior to the meal, go shopping for the perishable foodstuffs and start doing the prep work: Scrub, peel, and cut up veggies and put them back in the fridge all ready to go. Make pie fillings and put them in the fridge. You can even measure out dry ingredients and seasonings and put them in marked, covered containers so all you have to do is dump and stir at the last minute.

#3: Spread out the cooking. Thankfully, most side dishes taste just as fine made the day before as they do cooked fresh, and a few even benefit from sitting in the fridge overnight. Once you have your menu set, make a list of which dishes you can cook beforehand. Keep your recipes simple, so you spend less time in the kitchen and the good taste of the food can shine.

• Mashed potatoes are fine made a day or two ahead, seasoning and all, and then reheated, covered, in a 350-degree F oven for about 50 minutes before serving. You can heat them up with your reheated turkey to save energy. Add fresh herbs and a bit more butter after reheating.• Bread stuffing gets better and better with age—if you like a moist stuffing. If you like a dry, crumbly dressing, it’s best to save that for Thanksgiving Day. My favorite is bread stuffing made with from local bread seasoned with apples, fresh sage, onions, and homemade turkey stock.

• Cranberry sauce or relish can be prepared a few days ahead—raw relishes will get better with time.

• Gravy doesn’t really improve or get worse with time, so if you are cooking the turkey beforehand, go ahead and make the gravy, too.Save Thanksgiving Day cooking for roasting veggies—sweet potatoes, white beets, and parsnips with fresh rosemary are my favorites—and your oven-fresh pies, which you can serve with fresh small-batch vanilla ice cream from the local ice creamery.

#4: Delegate, delegate, delegate. It works at the office and it works at home, too. Assign guests and family members to take care of specific dishes and tasks. Send out your assignments this week, and don’t be a purist: query the cooks on your guest list to see if they’re up for making something or would prefer to grab something at the store.

#5: Make room in the fridge. Work on eating up (or composting) as much as possible out of your refrigerator from now till Thanksgiving Day, to allow room for all the ingredients, prepared dishes, and, eventually, leftovers.

#6: Procure and/or thaw your turkey NOW. When shopping, plan for about 1.3 pounds of turkey per person at the meal, and look for organic or heritage-breed birds, which are getting easier to find in regular grocery stores. If you can’t find one, check localharvest.org to see if any turkey breeders in your area have birds available for local pickup. And, one highly important turkey tip: If your bird is frozen, put it into the fridge to start thawing 4 or 5 days before you plan to eat it. Yes, it really will take that long!

#7: Roast—and carve—your turkey on Wednesday, not Thursday. At my house, I roast my turkey the day before I plan to serve it, partly because I detest worrying about the timing of getting the turkey done just right and on the table with everything else, and partly because of stress from my childhood. My father was a wonderful, talented man, but carving a turkey wasn’t one of those talents. And yet, he came from a time when the man of the house carved at the table. Period. My mother and I suffered through his painful (sometimes literally so) and colorfully narrated attempts every year, so perhaps I’m extra-sensitive about carving at the table.

• After roasting my turkey in the oven (forget time calculations: I roast it until the thermometer says it’s heated to the USDA-recommended 165 degrees F in the thigh), I let the bird sit on the stovetop until it cools a bit—30 minutes is good—and then I carefully cut off the breasts, legs, and any other parts I want to serve. I put the pieces in an ovenproof dish, cover it tightly, and put it in the fridge.

• Any bits of meat left on the carcass get picked off the carcass (it’s really easy when it is warm and fresh) and put them in the fridge for soup.

• Then I put the bones into a stockpot (seasonings are optional), cover them with water, bring the water to a boil, let it simmer on the stove for at least two hours, cool, and strain. Now I have lots of stock for making gravy and dressing on the day of the event.

• On Turkey Day, about an hour before everything else is ready, I simply take the ovenproof dish out of the fridge, and reheat it for an hour in a 350-degree oven. Voilà! No-stress turkey-roasting.In addition to saving my sanity, pre-roasting my turkey means that after-dinner cleanup is super-easy and stress-free, and there’s no need to cram the partially eaten thing into the fridge.

Source: Rodale (Author: Jean Nick).

Fruit juice is not linked to obesity, says study

October 18th, 2017

Findings of the meta-analysis support that 100 percent fruit juice consumption by children is not likely linked to obesity.

BARTOW – A new study provides evidence that consumption of 100 percent fruit juice, such as 100% orange juice, was not associated with weight gain in children over the age of 6 and is not expected to have an appreciable effect on weight gain in those under 6, according to a meta-analysis published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

In a commentary accompanying the study, the authors pointed out that past research shows that fruit juice is part of a high-quality diet, counts as a fruit serving, is convenient, and has a longer shelf life compared to whole fruit. They note that the findings of the meta-analysis support that 100 percent fruit juice consumption by children is not likely linked to obesity. While there are gaps in the literature, they conclude that there is no strong evidence that 100 percent fruit juice should be banned for all children, or in programs such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

Published in March, the study evaluated research related to the consumption of 100 percent fruit juice and changes in body mass index (BMI) among children ages 1 to 18 years. The meta-analysis comprised eight published studies that included over 34,000 individual children and looked at BMI or the BMI z-score, which indicates how weight changes with height over time and whether the changes are out of proportion with each other.

The study showed that for children age 6 and younger, a small amount of weight gain was observed but the amount was not considered to be clinically significant, meaning that the amount would likely not have any practical, genuine, or noticeable effect. The researchers reasoned that children age 2 and younger may be more susceptible to weight gain from 100 percent juice because it represents a larger proportion of their total daily calorie intake compared to older children. The authors also noted that the primary juice consumed by younger children is apple juice, whereas orange juice is favored by older children and has a lower glycemic load than apple juice. Although more research is needed for children age 6 and under, the AAP’s fruit juice intake guideline limits (4 to 6 ounces for children age 1 through 6 and 8 to 12 ounces for older children) are “prudent and should be followed.”

“The banning of fruit juice or failure to allow it in government food programs outside the first year of life is not consistent with the available evidence,” the authors wrote in their commentary.

References

Auerbach BJ, Wolf FM, Hikida A, Vallila-Buchman P, Littman A, Thompson D, Louden D, Taber DR, Krieger J. Fruit juice and change in BMI: A meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2017;139(4);e20162454. Published online March 23, 2017.

Abrams SA, Daniels SR. Fruit juice and child health. Pediatrics. 2017;139(4);e20170041. Published online March 23, 2017.

 

Source: Florida Department of Citrus

High blood pressure? Try a glass of orange juice!

August 15th, 2017

Good news for orange lovers: citrus fruit intake has been associated with reduced stroke risk.

The key may lie with a citrus phytonutrient called hesperidin, which appears to increase blood flow throughout the body, including the brain.

Using a machine known as a doppler fluximeter, scientists can measure blood flow through the skin using a laser beam.

If we hook people up to this machine and give them a solution containing the amount of hesperidin found in two cups of orange juice, blood pressure decreases and overall blood flow increases.

Good news for orange lovers: citrus fruit intake has been associated with reduced stroke risk.

When subjects drank straight orange juice instead of the hesperidin solution, their blood flow was even better. In other words, the stroke-reducing effects of oranges extend beyond just the hesperidin.

When it comes to food, the whole is often greater than the sum of its parts.

The positive effects of citrus fruits on blood flow don’t require a machine to measure them. In one study, scientists recruited women who suffered from sensitivity to cold weather due to poor blood flow — women with chronically cold hands, feet and toes — and placed them in a highly air-conditioned room.

The women in the experimental group drank a solution containing actual citrus phytonutrients, while another (control) group drank a placebo (an artificially flavoured orange drink).

The placebo drinkers got colder and colder. Because of decreased blood flow, the temperature of their fingertips dropped nearly 13c during the course of the study.

The fingertips of the women who drank real citrus, meanwhile, cooled less than half as fast, because their blood flow remained steadier.

The researchers also had both groups of women plunge their hands into icy water and saw the citrus drinkers recover about 50 per cent faster than the control group.

Source: DailyMail.co.uk

Sip the Health Benefits of Orange Juice for Clearer Arteries

August 2nd, 2017

Whether beside oatmeal or eggs, this breakfast favorite helps prevent hardening of the arteries: orange juice.

The health benefits of orange juice include vitamin C. And in a study of men, those with a high intake of vitamin C—as well as berries and other fresh fruit —experienced significantly less thickening of their carotid arteries compared with the low fruit-and-C group.

Findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition confirms the presence of a natural plant chemical called hesperidin – part of a a class of disease-fighting compounds found in plant foods like tea, fruit, soya and cocoa.

Although previous studies have hinted orange juice may be good for the heart, scientists have been uncertain exactly what gives it its protective powers, til now.

Pipe-Cleaning C

Clear arteries. They’re super important because gunk-free can often mean problem-free. But carotid-artery thickness is important, too. It’s a direct measure of atherosclerosis—the narrowing and hardening of the arteries that can lead to heart disease, heart attack, or stroke. To keep your arteries wide open and pliable for years to come, you need the health benefits of orange juice and other foods rich in vitamin C and pipe-friendly antioxidants. 

Open Wide

Aside from preventing the hardening of the arteries, similar studies have found that vitamin C may help protect your cardiovascular system in numerous ways as well. Whether you get the health benefits of orange juice or another vitamin-C-rich food, the cells lining your arteries will improve, your risk of blood clots will decrease, and bad-for-your-heart inflammation will fade away.

Orange juice ‘improves brain function’

July 12th, 2017

A small study, which saw 37 adults with an average age of 67 consume 500ml (just under a pint) of orange juice daily for eight weeks, found they had an 8% overall improvement in cognitive function compared with a group who consumed a control drink.

At the beginning and end of the eight weeks their memory, reaction time and verbal fluency was measured by carrying out eight tests.

One of the tests of verbal memory required learning a list of words to be recalled immediately, and again after a 30-minute delay.

Researchers said an 8 per cent improvement equates to remembering one more word from a shopping list of 15 items. Small improvements such as this over an eight-week period could translate into substantial improvements over the lifespan.

While the researchers are not recommending that people drink 500ml of orange juice every day, due to its high sugar content, they said their findings show that the constituents of orange juice could play an important role in providing brain-boosting nutrients as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

Co-author Dr Daniel Lamport, of the University of Reading’s School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, said orange juice is a major source of a group of naturally occurring plant phytochemicals known as flavonoids, and is particularly rich in a subclass of flavonoids, known as flavanones.

Recent studies have shown that flavonoids may improve memory through the activation of signalling pathways in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that is associated with learning and memory.

He said with a rapidly ageing population and estimations that the number of persons aged 60 or over could triple by 2100, it is “imperative” that simple, cost-effective ways to improve cognitive function in old age are explored.

“Small, easily administered changes to the daily diet, such as eating more flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables, have the potential to substantially benefit brain health,” he said.

“We know that people find it difficult to sustain big changes to their diet but simple alterations are much easier to maintain permanently.

“More research on the positive effects of flavonoids on cognition is still needed. However, this is an important discovery which strengthens the growing body of evidence that flavonoid-rich foodstuffs could play a big role in tackling cognition decline in old age.”

Source: Telegraph.co.uk

Starting Your Day With Orange Juice May Be Really Good For You, According To Science

July 10th, 2017

For better brain function, consider starting your day with a nice big glass of orange juice, a new study says. Researchers from the University of Reading say that by drinking just over two glasses of orange juice every day, you’ll show slight improvements in brain function in around two months.

The small study involved just 37 healthy older adults with an average age of 67, who were split into two groups: an OJ group that drank half a liter of juice every day for eight weeks and a control group that drank the same amount of a drink similar in taste and calories.

The participants were given a number of tests both at the start and end of the study, giving them a composite cognition score, based on things like memory, verbal fluency and reaction time.

Eight weeks later, the OJ group saw an 8 percent improvement in their overall cognition, when compared with the control group.

Though the results are modest, University of Reading researchers say that if the improvements continued, OJ drinkers could potentially reap major benefits over a longer period. “Small, easily administered changes to the daily diet, such as eating more flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables, have the potential to substantially benefit brain health. We know that people find it difficult to sustain big changes to their diet but simple alterations are much easier to maintain permanently,” the study’s co-author Daniel Lamport said in a release.

The recommendations are interesting as many nutritionists recommend eating whole fruit rather than juices when possible, since juices are often loaded with added sugars and calories, but without the fiber to reduce the sugar spikes.

The University of Reading researchers point to the flavonoids in OJ as the cause of improved cognition. Flavonoids are compounds that have antioxidant properties and are found abundantly in foods like blueberries, green tea and chocolate. Other studies have backed up the claims of flavonoids’ brain-boosting power. A 2012 study found that the flavonoids in blueberries and strawberries could help stave off cognitive aging by more than two years in older people. Another eight-week study found that subjects who drank flavonoid-rich cocoa beverages performed better on memory and cognition tests.

Source: Yagana Shah, Huffington Post

The amazing health benefits of grapefruit

June 26th, 2017

Merely hearing the name of this juicy fruit, or seeing it in the produce aisle, can make our palates cringe and our face scrunch up. Although the slightly bitter and sour grapefruit may not cater to some taste buds, its red, pink, and white pulp varieties are loaded with vitamins and minerals, which add on to its touted health benefits. The moon-shaped fruit is not only rich in vitamin C, but it also provides us with unexpected benefits — from our immune system to our metabolism.

Lauren Blake, a registered dietician at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, believes we should opt for the pink- and red-colored varieties to reap the most benefits of this cancer-fighting fruit. “Pink and red colored grapefruit contain the antioxidant lycopene,” Blake told Medical Daily in an email. “Lycopene appears to have propertied that help fight free radicals, which are compounds that can damage cells.” Add this low-calorie fruit to your diet today to uncover the great benefits of grapefruit for your health.

1. Strengthens Immune System

It is well known any fruit rich in vitamin C will strengthen and support our immune system. Vitamin C works with other micronutrients that provide good and regular nourishment for the body. Micronutrient deficiencies of vitamins A, B6, C, and E have been found to alter immune responses in animals and are thought to have a similar effect on the human immune response.

Maintaining good levels of vitamin C in the body can reduce the severity of cold symptoms, acting as a natural antihistamine. This makes it helpful in controlling allergies, since it reduces histamine levels. “Grapefruit is abundant in vitamin C which help supports the immune system,” Blake said. “Half of a grapefruit provides about 78 percent of your recommended daily intake of Vitamin C.”

2. Boosts Metabolism

Grapefruit is a popular diet staple among those looking to lose weight. A high metabolism can continue to burn fat in the body even when it is resting. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food found people who ate half a grapefruit before each meal, without making any other dietary changes, lost an average of 3 and a half pounds over 12 weeks.

The copious amount of enzymes, high-water content, and less sodium helps burn fat easily. Blake said: “While grapefruit does not have any magical fat-burning properties, it is low in calories and is a good source of fiber, which helps keep us full for longer by taking longer to digest. … Grapefruit also has a high water content which can help you feel full and stay hydrated.”

3. Reduces Kidney Stones Risk

Naringenin — known for its bitter taste of grapefruit — has been found to successfully prevent the formation of kidney cysts. According to a report by AlphaGalileo.org, the naturally occurring compound regulates the PKD2 protein that is responsible for the condition. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects not only help prevent the formation of cysts, but also reduce swelling in the kidneys that is caused by fluid retention. Drinking up to a liter of grapefruit juice daily will help reap the greatest benefits in effectively blocking the formation of kidney cysts.

4. Fights Gum Disease

Simply eating two grapefruits a day can prevent and even reverse damage caused by gum disease. A 2005 study published in the British Dental Journal found the daily consumption of grapefruit can reduce gum bleeding for those who suffer from gum disease. The participants in the study also showed an increase in their vitamin C levels, which aids in the repair of gums. Vitamin C, according to Blake, is essential for healthy gums, which helps keep our teeth firmly in place.

5. Protects Against Cancer

The antioxidant vitamin C has been linked to decrease the risk of certain cancers. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry found grapefruits help repair damaged DNA in human prostate cancer cells. Naringenin stimulates DNA repair in these cancer cells and protects the body from developing cancer.

“Diets high in vitamin C, which is an antioxidant found in many fruits and vegetables such as grapefruit, had been linked to a reduced risk of cancers of the stomach, colon, bladder, breast, and esophagus,” said Blake. She cautions these results are specific to vitamin C rich foods, rather than supplements.

6. Reduces Stress

You don’t necessarily have to ingest grapefruit to reap its benefits. The smell of citrus fruit can make a difference on curbing our stress and anxiety levels, and depression. A 1995 study published in the Japanese Journal of Psychopharmacology found citrus fragrance restored stress-induced immunosuppression, and induced calm behavior in mice.

Reap the benefits of grapefruit by adding it — and grapefruit juice —  to your diet.

Source: MedicalDaily.com

5 Reasons to Put Down the Gatorade and Pick Up the OJ Post-Workout

June 20th, 2017

Orange Juice as a recovery drink

Orange Gatorade (8oz) vs. Orange Juice (8oz)

 

Orange Gatorade (8oz)

Uncle Matt’s Orange Juice (8oz)

CALORIES

50

110

TOTAL FAT

O

O

SODIUM

110 MG

0

POTASSIUM

33 MG

450 MG

TOTAL CARBS

14 G

26 G

SUGARS

14 G

22 G

PROTEIN

0 G

2 G

Move over, Gatorade! Uncle Matt’s Organic 100% orange juice is a serious contender for THE best post-workout recovery drink. With more potassium, beneficial B vitamins, vitamin C, and naturally-occurring fruit sugar per 8 ounce serving, Uncle Matt’s Organic 100% not-from-concentrate orange juice is a great stand-alone recovery drink after a hard workout or the perfect smoothie-base for a natural sports drink with a protein advantage.

Here’s the play by play broken down that shows how Uncle Matt’s is the clear winner:

1. MORE POTASSIUM PER SERVING

Uncle Matt’s OJ has almost 14x more potassium than orange flavored Gatorade per 8-ounce serving. Why’s that important? Potassium is an electrolyte that helps lower pH levels in your body along with the amount of water you store. High body temps, sweating and dehydration during exercise deplete potassium and can lead to cramps. So replenishing your potassium stores post-workout is super-important; both to restore the electrolytes your body needs to perform and prevent cramping.

Winner: Uncle Matt’s

2. BENEFICIAL B VITAMINS

Without adequate amounts of B vitamins such as thiamine, niacin, and B6, you can’t properly convert carbohydrates, fat and protein into energy. B vitamins act as metabolic enzyme assistants, initiating certain steps in the metabolic process. In other words, they help your body regain energy after exercising. Dietitian Ellen Coleman recommends B vitamins in liquid form post-workout to quickly increase their absorption. So when it comes to B Vitamins RDA? Uncle Matt’s 10%, Gatorade 0%.

Winner: Uncle Matt’s

3. CORTISOL-LOWERING VITAMIN C  Studies show that taking vitamin C pre- or post-workout can minimize the catabolic stress response and speed recovery. Also, vitamin C can help lower cortisol after the workout, offsetting its detrimental effects. Eight ounces of Uncle Matt’s Organic orange juice provides 80% of the vitamin C you need to recover for the day. Gatorade? Zero.

Winner: Uncle Matt’s

 4. THE NATURAL SUGAR ADVANTAGE

 What a lot of people don’t realize is that Uncle Matt’s Organic orange juice contains NO ADDED SUGAR. What it does have is the naturally-occurring sugar found in the whole oranges that are fresh-squeezed at the juicing plant to make our 100% not-from-concentrate juice. What’s more, studies confirm that the sugar found in 100% fruit juices is absorbed into the bloodstream relatively slowly, creating only a moderate rise in insulin levels. This is good news because consuming sugar after a workout is vital for restocking muscle-glycogen stores. In fact, in the hour immediately after a workout, almost none of the sugar you eat turns into fat. That’s right! This is where insulin (did you mean to say sugar???) doesn’t deserve the bad rap it gets. Since it’s anabolic, insulin from natural fruit sugar quickly diverts nutrients into your muscles, stopping muscle breakdown while speeding repair. In other words, a short insulin spike right after a workout is what you want.

Winner: Uncle Matt’s

 5. SMOOTHIE SYNERGY

It’s true: taken after a workout, sugar combined with protein expedites recovery while helping you build muscle. Remember that sugar boosts insulin levels, which are typically low after a workout. So when you get those muscle-building amino acids from protein, sugar is actually being used to transport those amino acids, efficiently fueling your muscles when they need it most. It’s a one-two punch you can’t beat and so easy to make by adding a scoop of your favorite protein to our 100% organic orange juice. ­­­­ Gatorade in a smoothie? Um… not the same.

Winner: Uncle Matt’s

 

 

5 Farmer Proven Secrets to Help Your Backyard Citrus Tree Thrive through Winter

January 13th, 2017

Winter means colder nights and drier days for your backyard citrus tree.  Uncle Matt’s Production Manager, Benny McLean, offers the inside scoop on how to ensure your backyard tree not only survives, but thrives, during the colder winter months.

Plant Your Tree in a Smart Location. If you’re about to plant a citrus tree in your backyard, it actually matters where. If at all possible, plant your tree on the southeast corner of your home. Here’s why: the killer freezes of recent decades came into Florida with a strong northwesterly wind. If your tree is planted near your house’s southeast corner, your home acts as a shield to block a direct hit from damaging winds. It’s important to know that citrus trees exposed to temperatures 28 degrees or below for 4 or more hours will result in fruit damage, while trees exposed to temperatures of 24 degrees or below for 4 or more hours are vulnerable to wood damage which harms the tree itself.

Protect Your Tree during a Hard Freeze. What if your tree is already planted elsewhere in your yard and vulnerable to the elements? If it’s three to five years old, you may be able to use this DIY hack involving a trash bag, a light bulb and an extension cord. Depending on the size of your tree, you can visit www.uline.com or your local hardware store to purchase extra large trash bags up to 96 gallons.  When the threat of a hard freeze approaches, slide the trash bag over the tree, seal it around the base and put a 100-watt lightbulb inside. Keep the lightbulb turned on overnight. The heat generated by the lightbulb generates enough heat to protect the tree from plummeting temperatures, while the trash bag traps the heat inside.

Nourish Your Tree the Organic Way. For the best in tree nutrition during the winter, Benny recommends a one-two punch of compost and organic brown sugar. According to Benny, January is the best month to apply a 50-lb bag of Black Kow compost available at Lowe’s or Home Depot.  Apply an entire 50-lb bag of compost under each citrus tree in your yard. Spread it out from the trunk to the edge of the tree, forming a circle of compost under the tree.  Next, take two cups of certified organic brown sugar (yes, has to be organic and brown!) and sprinkle it on top of the Black Kow compost and then water the mixture. The organic brown sugar acts as a food source for the beneficial microbes (aka bacteria) in your soil to break down the compost and release the nutrients in the compost, which in turn feeds the tree. This program is an effective way to help the tree fight citrus greening disease (link this) and pests while producing delicious, nutrient-dense fruit.

Don’t Over-Irrigate. Believe it or not, you don’t want to overwater your backyard citrus tree through winter. The tree needs to “stay asleep,” or stay in dormancy. According to Benny, watering more than once a week for an hour would cause the tree to “wake up” and flush, leaving it susceptible to new growth damage should an unexpected freeze occur.

Choose the Right Citrus Varieties. If you want your citrus tree to thrive, choose a variety that grows well in backyard soil. Depending on when you want to harvest your fruit, Benny’s recommendations include:

  • Sugarbells, available around Thanksgiving
  • Navel oranges, available around Christmas
  • Red Grapefruit, available around mid-January
  • Valencias (a great juicing orange), available around Easter

Uncle Matt’s vs. Starbucks: When It Comes to Your Smart Sip of the Morning, There’s No Comparison

December 22nd, 2016

Uncle Matt's Orange Juice vs Starbucks

 

Before you sip that next breakfast drink, know this: not all sugars are created equal. In fact, when it comes to making the healthy choice between a tall Starbucks Caramel Frappuccino and an 8-ounce glass of Uncle Matt’s Organic Orange Juice, the nutrition facts are stacked heavily in OJ’s favor. Here’s why:

Uncle Matt’s Organic orange juice contains no added sugars. That’s right, the only sugar you’ll find in Uncle Matt’s OJ is the kind Mother Nature created from the fruit.  Besides that, orange juice provides many key nutrients we need every day, such as vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, folate, thiamin, magnesium, vitamin B6, carotenoids, phytonutrients and flavonoids, and OJ is fat free.

In comparison, one tall Starbucks Caramel Frappuccino contains 46 grams of sugar ––– and not the naturally-occurring kind that’s made by photosynthesis. Plus, when you drizzle the caramel on top? Hello high fructose corn syrup!  By the way, HFCS has been linked to increasing weight gain, hypertension and bad cholesterol levels. (Triple yuck!) And when you go ahead and add a dollop of whip? Even more calories from fat and sugar!

Both granulated sugar and high fructose corn syrup go through a refining process that strips the sugar of any nutritional value it might have once had rendering the calories “empty.” In addition, processed sugar can lower immunity, become addicting and rob your body of energy and health. Considering the  frappuccino’s refined sugar overload along with a whopping 270 calories, it’s easy to see why nature-made orange juice is your smart sip of the morning.